Guardian op-ed refers to Ahed Tamimi as a “political prisoner”

The suggestion that Tamimi, who was arrested for assaulting an Israeli soldier and for incitement, by endorsing (on video) armed “resistance”, is a “political prisoner” is beyond absurd. The term “political prisoner” is as codified as pertaining only to those detained in violation of “freedom of thought, conscience and religion, freedom of expression and information, freedom of assembly and association”.

The Guardian published an op-ed on March 9th, about the arrest of Palestinian activist Munther Amira, which included the following characterisation of another ‘activist’ – Ahed Tamimi (aka, Shirley Temper):

Amira was protesting against the detention and alleged mistreatment of Palestinian child political prisoners, including 17-year-old Ahed Tamimi

The suggestion that Tamimi, who was arrested for assaulting an Israeli soldier and for incitement, by endorsing (on video) armed “resistance”, is a “political prisoner” is beyond absurd.  The term “political prisoner” is codified as pertaining only to those detained in violation of “freedom of thought, conscience and religion, freedom of expression and information, freedom of assembly and association”.

Tamimi wasn’t arrested because she expressed an anti-Israel view, but because she engaged in violence and encouraged others to launch lethal attacks on civilians.

Note that in May 2013, UK Media Watch prompted a correction to a Guardian article by Harriet Sherwood which similarly mischaracterised 100 Palestinians prisoners convicted for terror offenses as “political prisoners”.

We’ve complained to editors about this latest op-ed, but haven’t yet received a reply.

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