Guardian anti-Israel propaganda photo of the day (Palestinian children edition)

H/T Margie

When it comes to reports about Israel at the Guardian, their inventory of misleading anti-Israel images are clearly quite abundant.

Indeed, the Guardian received an Honest Reporting “2010 Dishonest Reporting Award due to this memorable photo, and accompanying headline:

Eyewitness: Palestinian youth run down

In addition to the curious fact, noted by HR, that the camermen (among others) just happened to be “in the right place at the right time”, the fact that an innocent Israeli motorist was trying desperately to avoid harm, from a pre-planned ambush by seven rock throwing Palestinians, evidently wasn’t a compelling enough narrative.

For the Guardian, such messy details can never get in the way of tales of Israeli villainy, especially those involving the infliction of harm upon Palestinian children.

A Guardian report by Chris McGreal, UN vote on Palestinian state put off amid lack of support“, Nov. 11, included the following photo:

I must admit, the propaganda value is simply off the charts: Israeli soldiers juxtaposed with an innocent Palestinian boy holding a sign with an image of Mahmoud Abbas, which included text asking, in Dickensian fashion, “Please sir, I want a state”.

Of course, my guess is that the Palestinian Authority rejected text, to accompany the graphic, of Abbas’s quote from a recent speech, reported by the PA news agency, accusing settlers of releasing trained wild hogs to attack Palestinian Arabs.

And, they likely similarly rejected one of the many Abbas quotes insisting that he will never recognize a Jewish state;  his praise for Hamas’s kidnapping of Gilad Shalit and support for armed “resistance”, or his administration’s refusal to allow Palestinian refugees to settle in, and become citizens of, a new Palestinian state.

It’s likely that the PA rejected the following, which more accurately reflects the politics of a “President” now in the sixth year of a four year term.

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